(not provided): Using R and the Google Analytics API

(not provided) terms from Google average 35%-60% of all organic search terms

(not provided) terms from Google average 35%-60% of all Google organic search terms

For power users of Google Analytics, there is a heavy dose of spreadsheet work that accompanies any decent analysis.  But even with Excel in tow, it’s often difficult to get the data just right without resorting to formula hacks and manual table formatting.  This is where the Google Analytics API and R can come very much in handy.

Continue reading

Effect Of Modified Bounce Rate In Google Analytics

A few months back, Justin Cutroni posted on his blog some jQuery code that modifies how Google Analytics tracks content.  Specifically, the code snippet changes how bounce rate and time on site are calculated, creates a custom variable to classify whether visitors are “Readers” vs. “Scanners” and adds some Google Analytics events to track how far down the page visitors are reading.

Given that this blog is fairly technical and specific in nature, I was interested in seeing how the standard Google Analytics metrics would change if I implemented this code and how my changes compared to Justin’s.  I’ve always suspected my bounce rate in the 80-90% range didn’t really represent whether people were finding value in my content.  The results were quite surprising to say the least!

Continue reading

How To Install Optimizely on WordPress

If you’ve spent any time working in digital marketing or analytics, you’re already familiar with the power of A/B testing.  A/B testing (and it’s more complicated brother multivariate testing) allows site owners to find out optimal combinations of site design and content for their visitors without having to directly ask/inconvenience the user.  All it takes to improve a website is forming a hypothesis of something that could work better, creating multiple versions of a page (or other content), setting up the experiment…and the money flows in faster than you can count it.  At least, that’s the hope!

At the enterprise level, there are plenty of testing tools such as Omniture Test & Target, SiteSpect, WebTrends Optimize, and Monetate, but these tools are cost-prohibitive to all but the largest websites.  Google provides Google Website Optimizer (for free!), but that has often been viewed as difficult to manage, especially for dynamically created websites.  That’s where Optimizely comes in.

Optimizely’s tagline is “A/B testing software you’ll actually use”, a reference to complication (and I think indirectly, the expense) of other testing tools in the marketplace.  Optimizely claims is that you can start testing after adding a single line of JavaScript code…and here’s how you do it.

Continue reading

Google Analytics Individual Qualification (IQ) – Passed!

I'm going to print this out and put it on my fridge!

Sample Certification Question:

A)  I only

B) I and II

C) I and III

D)  I, II, and III

You know you’re a web analytics geek when:

I)  You run Google Analytics on multiple blogs, just to practice

II)  You analyze the hell out of your Google Analytics data, even though your blog only gets 100 pageviews per day

III)  Your wife goes out for the evening and you think, “Hmm…I could probably pass the Google Analytics Individual Qualification exam before she gets home”

The answer, sadly, is D.  But I suspect you already knew that 🙂


Google Analytics SEO reports: Not Ready For Primetime?

On October 4th, Google announced that the Webmaster Tools/Google Analytics integration was now available to all users. The three new reports (Queries, Landing Pages, and Geographical Summary) are intended to allow site owners and content creators to monitor how well their content is indexed in Google for their keywords of interest across time, all within the Google Analytics interface.  However, based on my preliminary research from the first few days of data, I have to question the current algorithm’s accuracy.

Continue reading